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Cann Global Announces T12 Food business has secured its first purchase order of 6900 bottles from Costco Australia for its VitaHemp certified organic hemp oil capsules

The Cann Global Ltd (ASX: CGB) share price has been a big mover on the Australian share market on Thursday. Cann Global’s Food division corporate head, Eli Levy, appeared to be very pleased with the order. Levy said, “This is a major step towards building a strong relationship with the global wholesaler who currently have 11 locations Australia and a 12th to open soon in Perth. Costco’s member first policy and high quality ethos will be a perfect fit for T12’s business model which includes Australia and Asia.”

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The Cann Global Ltd (ASX: CGB) share price has been a big mover on the Australian share market on Thursday.

The cannabis company’s shares are up 16% to 2.9 cents in afternoon trade following the release of a positive update.

What did Cann Global announce?

This morning the company announced that its T12 Food business has become an official supplier to retail giant Costco in Australia.

According to the release, the T12 Food business has secured its first purchase order of 6900 bottles from Costco Australia for its high demand VitaHemp certified organic premium hemp oil daily capsules. This remains subject to delivery and acceptance.

Another positive is that management revealed that it is optimistic that deals with Costco for other T12 products will soon follow.

Cann Global’s Food division corporate head, Eli Levy, appeared to be very pleased with the order. Levy said, “This is a major step towards building a strong relationship with the global wholesaler who currently have 11 locations Australia and a 12th to open soon in Perth. Costco’s member first policy and high quality ethos will be a perfect fit for T12’s business model which includes Australia and Asia.”

Executive chairperson of Cann Global, Pnina Feldman, echoed this sentiment.

Feldman said: “We are very excited to receive this first order from Costco, one of Australia’s largest Food Retailers, and is proof of the hard work that has gone into producing our high quality and very nutritious products which we believe will continue to set the standard for this industry in Australia. Our hemp seed oil capsules, developed by our dedicated and innovative management team led by the Edwards brothers, are a natural and plant-based alternative to fish oil capsules without the fishy after taste. We hope to see this and all our T12 products and brands on many Australian tables in the years to come and distributed across Asia.”

Also on the move in the cannabis industry on Thursday have been the Elixinol Global Ltd (ASX: EXL) share price with a 4.5% decline following the release of its half year results, and the MGC Pharmaceuticals Ltd (ASX: MXC) share price which is up 5%. This morning MGC released its prospectus to raise $1 million at 4 cents per share.

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Source: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/asx-cannabis-share-just-surged-025342917.html

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The Evolution Of Farm To Table For Cannabis & Hemp: Interview with Niko Uman Borrero founder & CEO of Green Bee Farms

“My goals,” he explains, “are to bring regenerative cannabis to the market, to bring true medicine to the people where organic is organic. Where our fertilizers and our feeds are sourced within 250 miles from the farm, and to make our brand known as a truly holistic company.” 

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AUTHOR: Glenn Johnson

PUBLISHER: CANNABIS LAW REPORT

 

THE EVOLUTION OF FARM TO TABLE FOR CANNABIS & HEMP

 

Niko Uman Borrero is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Green Bee Farms, a holistic based cannabis consultant agency that specializes in helping cattle ranchers change their hayfields into hempfields and manage their cattle using high-intensity grazing practices. His mission is to “run a biodynamic farm that offers a variety of beneficial products to the community and helps teach people about the benefits of holistic sustainable living.”

 

I spoke to him to hear more about where he saw the industry heading. “My goals,” he explains, “are to bring regenerative cannabis to the market, to bring true medicine to the people where organic is organic. Where our fertilizers and our feeds are sourced within 250 miles from the farm, and to make our brand known as a truly holistic company.” 

 

Starting at a young age, Niko has always found himself in the garden. As high school came around he was first placed into a horticulture class where he wanted more from the program, progressing onto a school/work program that helped build one of the first carbon-neutral aquaponic facilities in the U.S.

I asked Niko, what do you want the consumer’s overall experience to be over the next 5 years with hemp, what trends are you seeing today?

 

“Hemp is a super plant, with all of its uses and possibilities, there’s no wonder it’s gaining traction quickly.  I want to see houses made using its fiber, bio-decomposable plastics in the packaging field, and fewer chemicals being used in the textile industry.” 

 

“If you take a look at the sustainable food market, it is already occurring, more people are choosing forks over knives, asking their supermarket for “natural alternatives” towards personal care products, consumables and the cutlery to eat said products. Even popular media channels like Netflix are delivering documentaries based on the need for a new culture. By living and working towards sustainability we can truly create a green future. Hemp will be one of the key materials to get us there.”

 

“We have the opportunity to leapfrog over cannabis,” he continued “once the market understands regenerative agriculture, and it may take a little bit, but once it gets going, with the proper application of sustainable practices, it becomes so much more than medicinal, the fabrications and myriad of applications for hemp that excites me. Consistently changing the way we create a symbiosis with  agriculture, one step at a time.”

 

According to the USDA Farm Agency 146,065 acres of Hemp were planted in 2019. This country in fact has a long history in Hemp pre-prohibition. Rudolf Diesel, the inventor of the diesel engine, designed it to run on vegetable and seed oils like hemp. Henry Ford constructed a car of resin stiffened hemp fiber, and even ran the car on ethanol made from hemp. Not only was the Mayflower equipped with hemp fiber products durable to make the fateful crossing, but it was also equipped with a supply of hemp seeds to be grown at the Pilgrims new home. 

 

Niko sees a future filled with Hemp products once again, “it’s the new categories that excite me: Plastics, hempcrete, paper in general…textiles there’s so many things you can do with it. Once Iowa grows it like they do corn then we’ll see bio-degenerative plastic, livestock feeds, and composite boards really hitting the market.”

 

“When talking about consumables, much like the wine industry and its focus on the uniqueness of terroir, and even French Appellations, we aim to mimic the wine model in hemp farming. Like growing hops for beer or corn for whiskey, we’re taking regional insights and applying them to hemp at many levels. In Vermont, for example, we’re ahead of the game, all organic sun grown, no foliar sprays of any kind, running 3.5 acres, it’s a lot of work that goes into it and we only have 3 people,” says Niko.

 

“The markets are changing and we aim to change with them. Survival of the most willing to adapt you could say. We’re working with a cattle farmer, and the milk market is terrible right now, he teamed up with us as a way to supplement his income and keep his cows on the farm. By teaming with us we had a direct supply to fertilizer, tractors, and someone who really knew there land. Together we can focus on quality and create a complete  full spectrum plant because we took such care from seed to sale. I want to bring in a high quality product, super high grade to the market.”

 

Shortly after legalization, Niko studied Agricultural Business and Organic Gardening at Colorado State University with an emphasis on hemp and cannabis. Because of federal guidelines, much of what he wanted to do was unavailable within the College, so he left to work for Way To Grow, Boulder. Here he talked with a variety of grow managers and was able to analyze specific soil and fertilizer “recipes” that companies manufactured and grow managers preferred. By being at the forefront of the legalization movement, it was a very free environment where people shared their tips and tricks on how they grew.

 

Realizing that most of the products listed as “organic” weren’t always organic, or cheap, Niko knew there had to be another way. It was during this time that he went down to Colombia to work for his uncle’s cattle ranch where they ran 400 head of cattle and roughly 20,000 tilapia.

 

It was here where basic things such as tape measures, drills and duct tape were not available and the most sophisticated tool they had was slow internet and a scale to measure the fish. This is the true reality for most farms in rural third world communities. So the question for him became, “how do we make fertilizers for the farm, on the farm?” This led Niko to books by Allan Savory, biodynamic tips by Rudolf Steiner, and Korean Natural Farming techniques being taught on Youtube by Erik Weinart and Chris Trump.

 

“With new ideas and collaborations, we can help the world by creating farms that are run by farms. We believe through mimicry there still is a lot to learn, from the way you move cattle, to the way you fertilize a plant. Mimicry is everywhere.”

 

Now that Niko has returned to Vermont he is currently helping dairy farmers progress there certified organic fields into Hemp. Using Soil tests, companion planting, local ingredients, and fermentations, he hopes to make Green Bee Farms a farm for the future with a copyable method that improves organic matter within the soil and changes the way commercial agriculture is run.

“With Indoor vs outdoor your yields are higher quality, and we need to build the capital for greenhouses, so we go slow and grow accordingly. We’ve bootstrapped most of this off of college funds, and we’re playing this for the long game. By showing people the power of regenerative agriculture and the symbiosis in nature, we can change the world for the better and create a greener future for everyone.”

 

I ended my conversation with him to ask — If you had three wishes for the industry, including the consumer in them—what three wishes would you make?

 

  1. There’s still a lot of education we have to do for consumers to have more of an understanding of how “every dollar counts” when they make day to day purchasing decisions. Think about it, you vote 3 times a day based on the food you eat, if you choose organic, grass-fed, biodynamic foods, more farmers will grow sustainably. In the larger sense, this is also tied into Congress and where farmer subsidies go. By giving subsidies for local farmers who regenerate the land,you are supporting a vibrant, robust, sustainable eco-system for the natural surroundings. And at the same time an educated consumer is getting healthier food, providing a true localized Economy that becomes self sufficient. 

  2. For the overall farming industry, there’s a lot of education and sharing to be done too. I would like more farmers to understand how their inputs affect their outputs. If you consistently feed a synthetic crop to your soil, you aren’t feeding the “soul” you are going directly to the crop and missing out on microbes, fungi, and the symbiosis held within the soil. We have to work on sustainability and process, share our knowledge and create systems that better everything around us.

  3. My third wish would be for more innovation, I wake up every day with the thought that each day is a blessing, and a new day to learn. If more people lived that way we would have a lot more Leonardo DaVinci’s and a lot less Paris Hiltons. 

 

To learn more About Niko and Green Bee Farms, including valuable resource lists, links and downloads of precious data on growing, visit https://greenbeefarms.org/ For the products he helps grow, you can visit https://greenbeepharms.com and give him a follow on https://www.instagram.com/greenbeepharms/

 

About Glenn Johnson

I am a Marketing, Branding and Communications Consultant w/ experience in high-touch luxury consumer marketing in the travel/hospitality, wine/spirits, fashion/beauty/grooming and Cannabis categories. My talents include Branding & Brand development, Business Building, Strategy and Brand Storytelling. I excel in working with Founders, funders, start-ups, and small brands and enjoy meeting and networking with interesting folks in the business.

 

CONTACT ME via email at: glenn.johnson@gmail.com

Connect with me on LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glenn-johnson-8018944/

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Cannabis Testing + Branding = Business Building

From a branding and marketing standpoint, I’m convinced that until we bridge the science of the medical market with the consumer’s experience in the recreational market, ignorance will linger and the market will plateau with over-saturated brands and buzzwords that deflate the meaning of efficacy. As an example, look at the bubble of CBD in the last year to see consumers swooning over science that is yet to be regulated and false or misleading packaging that profligates on shelves across the US.

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If you wish to re-publish this story please do so with following accreditation

AUTHOR: Glenn Johnson

PUBLISHER: CANNABIS LAW REPORT

 

 

Shannon Swantek, CQA, Principal Scientist, CEO, Enlightened Quality Analytics

 

Building the bridge between brands and the marketplace through testing and the importance of good data.

 

From a branding and marketing standpoint, I’m convinced that until we bridge the science of the medical market with the consumer’s experience in the recreational market, ignorance will linger and the market will plateau with over-saturated brands and buzzwords that deflate the meaning of efficacy. As an example, look at the bubble of CBD in the last year to see consumers swooning over science that is yet to be regulated and false or misleading packaging that profligates on shelves across the US.

 

If left to their own devices in Cannabis, a mixed bag of state regulations will continue to confuse the market as they rush to implement policies that are challenging for business and almost impossible for the consumer to understand. We all have to do better.

 

At the forefront of the market today are those that are working to create the standardizations and methodologies behind testing that will ultimately regulate that experience and allow consumers a greater understanding of what they’re purchasing.

 

I spoke with Shannon Swantek, principal scientist behind Enlightened Quality Analytics about this to see her take on what’s happening today.

 

Shannon Swantek

 

QUESTION: What’s the state of the Cannabis business today?

 

The state of the industry today is focused on legitimization. Attracting qualified investors, operating in established financial structures, and developing the good practices and control to compete with the well-established industries entering the market—all require small licensees and corporate franchises alike to mature quickly in almost every facet of their business.

 

Where it was once acceptable to cut some corners and operate “cart before the horse” due to the speed at which the dynamics were changing, businesses today must begin to establish credibility not only to their client-base, but to the potential market at large.

 

QUESTION: Regulations, testing and brand messaging isn’t necessarily aligning in the market right now, is it? Especially in CBD/Hemp.

 

 

The general public is unaware of the lack of oversight in the CBD world and is therefore producing conflicting anecdotal storylines that the industry is poorly equipped to combat.

 

The data presented at the FDA hearings pointing to many “snake-oil” CBD products on the shelves that do not match their labels or contain adulterants or unwanted high THC levels highlighted the way this medicine is being undermined by poor customer experiences being linked directly to CBD itself.

 

QUESTION: Which we can see in the dangers of the current Vape crisis…

 

The vape crisis indeed was light shined on the dangers of the unregulated market and the lack of data from the regulated market about each unique product, from source material to formulation testing to adequately defend immediately against their involvement. These events, amongst other drivers, have shown the obvious need to regulate product safety in CBD and THC products in a holistic and standardized way.

 

QUESTION: Talk to me about product risk in today’s market and the importance of self-regulation.

 

Product risk has largely gone uncaptured as the early state regulatory structures of “point of sale testing” with one-size-fits-all risk created a false sense of security for consumers. This created financial drivers that were myopically focused on passing these tests and getting product on the shelves.

 

The reason the FDA regulated industries do not contain point of sale testing schemes is that the unique risks of each product, e.g a topical versus a suppository, can only be understood and captured by the producers themselves.

 

The corporate management familiar with the practices of other industries are starting to finally convey the value of having Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and an ISO compliant management systems beyond that of just meeting regulatory requirements.

 

QUESTION: How will this ultimately help the market?

 

By developing testing schemes at each point of product development, it is possible to more fully understand and optimize their product resulting in more cost efficient manufacturing processes.

 

A need for data at all of these levels and data specific to product type drives more advanced methodology in the laboratories, often resulting in a better understanding of the matrix and more accurate data.

 

It’s an exciting time for the industry and those that are embracing the USDA, vape events, and FDA hearings as the catalyst that was needed to jump-start industry efforts globally into legitimacy.

 

QUESTION: Data will ultimately translate into the consumer’s experience, and elevate a greater understanding for efficacy and controls when it comes to purchasing products, correct?

 

 

The lack of education at every level of the industry, from regulators and prescribers to patients and customers, added to the misinformation that is constantly being disseminated as part of aggressive marketing practices, has been hurting the industry chances of success from the early days.

 

For example, creating strain names that do not match the genetics of a product, using undefined terms such as “solvent-less” and “full spectrum” inappropriately, and touting “certifications” from groups that were not granted authority to certify by any overarching industry community allows the bad actors to differentiate themselves in misleading ways.

 

The lack of transparency and availability of product information as it pertains to formulations, ingredients, and accurate label information robs the consumer of the knowledge needed to make informed choices. This makes brand loyalty an unpredictable goal and metric as it is unclear what is driving consumer choices through the early stages of industry development.

 

QUESTION: You’ve mentioned to me previously that as an industry, we must become informed, speak out against the rampant misinformation, and demand more as consumers from our producers—can you explain this more?

 

Due to the lack of quality management systems mentioned above, producers and processors are not soliciting feedback from their clients and do not have the ability to refine and optimize the formulation of their products to meet client needs when they are identified. This creates marketing and branding strategies that are disconnected from the actual market which results in factors such as “THC %” being the sole price point when it is well known that products with a diverse cannabinoid and terpene profile are more desirable to consumers.

 

In addition, the false sense of security and trust in product safety and control, is largely created by a lack of education and available information on the regulatory and enforcement side.

 

With reliable sources of information being drowned out by industry “noise”, it is difficult to sift through the misinformation to find the science and data needed for regulators to crack down on false label claims, unregulated or unlisted ingredients, and just plain false advertising.

 

The lack of consumer confidence only furthers the ability for the bad actors of the industry to continue to keep the playing field leveled to their advantage as they understand that there is not reliable oversight and enforcement from the regulators, internally in the industry, nor from the market they are trying to fool.

 

QUESTION: You and your team at Enlightened Quality Analytics work across different categories, from Cannabis to dietary Supplements, Pharmaceuticals, and Environmental fields, why is that important to you?

 

Enlightened Quality Analytics is joining the two pieces necessary for any long-term successful business by bringing technical and quality support to the cannabis industry in a holistic package.

 

The days of easy money and wild west operations have proven to be costly for the industry, not only in product risk, but in operational costs and the often gross mis-valuation of businesses.

 

Organizations are running to keep up with demand and often grew so quickly that they did not have the time or resources in the beginning to build Quality Management Systems (QMS) with standardizing procedures ensuring they were producing their brand in the same way each time.

 

In addition, they did not create the tracking systems and records with the evidence to demonstrate that those procedures were effective in reaching the brand’s objectives. Without in-process testing to specifications, products can often be produced inconsistently producing large amounts of risk in product control

 

We have the top team of experts from each technical sphere in the industry with extensive backgrounds not only in cannabis but in the industries that cannabis businesses must start to emulate in order to flourish, such as the pharmaceutical, agricultural, and nutritional supplement industries.

 

Our team also has extensive experience and networks on the regulatory side of the business – having drafted policy and legislation at the state, federal and international levels.

 

FInally, we help organizations work with their laboratories for the right testing schemes, data quality objectives, and to produce data that can be validated in the event of litigation or dispute.

 

QUESTION: The Cannabis industry is evolving quickly for better or worse, how do you see it continuing as we look ahead toward more states coming online and eventual Federal regulation?

 

The industry is starting to understand that the requirements in a federal scheme will be very different than the “state by state” regulations that were put together, often hastily. This understanding is actually coming behind the realization that industry on an international level already demands quality management systems that are compliant to the same standards of mature industries.

 

These standards, such as ISO 9001:2015, ISO/IEC 17025:2017, and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) — the requirements put in place for consumer safety by the FDA for all consumable products from nutritional supplements to food — need to be in place for an organization to be prepared for the changes this dynamic market is facing.

 

External Quality Assessment (EQA), the method that allows for comparison of a laboratory’s testing to a source outside the laboratory is very important. EQA supports businesses at every stage – from facility design review for cross-contamination risks to helping producers design testing schemes that help them understand their unique product, control it, and optimize it.

 

QUESTION: What’s an example of a company doing it right?

 

Gary from TagLeaf holds our shared vision of true success for the cannabis industry that you and I have been talking about. This success is based on product safety and making data-based decisions which is why he developed TagLeaf and why it continues to grow in functionality and support of the industry past laboratories and into all areas of quality. TagLeaf’s platform employs specific modules that ultimately work together, integrating regulatory, compliance, product quality, validation & verification, and track & trace technology, allowing industry participants to manage the entirety of their supply chain.

 

Most cannabis laboratories cannot afford the complex and expensive LIMS systems in the market. TagLeaf is making quality accessible with a better product that is actually priced so that all size players in the industry can afford to implement proper data quality practices. This increases the quality level playing field across the industry but is not prohibitive for smaller operations; flying in the face of industry culture that keeps IP close to the chest and furthering the idea that sharing technical advances only supports the progress of the whole industry.

 

I firmly believe this is the only viable way for the industry to move forward independently without interference from regulatory or big business interests. The drive for quality has to come from within.

 

For more about Shannon, visit https://www.enlightenedquality.com/

 

About Glenn Johnson

I am a Marketing, Branding and Communications Consultant w/ experience in high-touch luxury consumer marketing in the travel/hospitality, wine/spirits, fashion/beauty/grooming and Cannabis categories. My talents include Branding & Brand development, Business Building, Strategy and Brand Storytelling. I excel in working with Founders, funders, start-ups, and small brands.

CONTACT ME via email at: glenn.johnson@gmail.com

Connect with me on LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glenn-johnson-8018944/

 

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Tasmanian Hemp Sourcing Company 13 Seeds Set To Raise $AUS6 Million In Float

13 Seeds generated $230,000 revenue in the 2019 financial year through sales of its 15 food products and 10 skin care products.

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The Australian Financial Review reports……….Tassie hemp business 13 Seeds cultivates IPO interest

The Apple Isle could lay claim to a new listed company before too long.

13 Seeds does not grow its own hemp but buys it off growers in Tasmania.  Supplied

As Tasmanian success story Bellamy’s looks set to leave the ASX via a Chinese takeover, hemp-based food and nutraceutical brand 13 Seeds hopes to take its place.

The company has kicked off its run at the boards, looking to raise up to $6 million at 20¢ a share in an initial public offering that will be open until December 3.

If successful, 13 Seeds would have a $15 million market capitalisation on listing.

PAC Partners was lead manager on the offer and is no stranger to the cannabis related stock world. The broker has also done work for ASX-listed pot stock Althea in the past.

13 Seeds’ similarities to Bellamy’s don’t just stop at being Tassie born and bred.

As with the formula company that produces no milk, 13 Seeds doesn’t grow its own hemp.

Instead, the company sources it through contract growers and partners on the island.

13 Seeds generated $230,000 revenue in the 2019 financial year through sales of its 15 food products and 10 skin care products.

Funds were told the company experienced 12.8 per cent compound monthly online sales growth during the 2019 financial year.

The company has a December 19 listing date in its sights.

Source:  https://www.afr.com/street-talk/tassie-hemp-business-13-seeds-cultivates-ipo-interest-20191120-p53cf9

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