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How medical cannabis can help osteoarthritis

When it comes to chronic disease, arthritis isn’t so much a novelty as it is an inevitability. Aging, injuries and a host of other lifestyle factors add to the risk of osteoarthritis. The wear-and-tear on the joint leads to the …

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When it comes to chronic disease, arthritis isn’t so much a novelty as it is an inevitability. Aging, injuries and a host of other lifestyle factors add to the risk of osteoarthritis. The wear-and-tear on the joint leads to the eventual degradation of cartilage, the shock absorbing tissue that allows for friction-free movement in the joint space. The inflammation leads to early morning stiffness in the area accompanied by muscle spasm and decreased range of motion. As the cartilage declines, symptoms such as restricted movement, deformity of the joint, instability, weakness and pain increase.

Statistics Canada estimates that 37 per cent of Canadians over the age of 19 have been diagnosed with osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is not a disease of the elderly. It is increasingly a disease of the young. Traumatic injury and obesity put people from all walks of life at risk.

Preventative measures such as low-impact activities and weight loss help to reduce the stress on joints. Treatments usually involve pain medication and anti-inflammatories. These symptomatic treatments, while effective, have side effects. The risk of dependency for opioid medication has made patients reluctant to try them, and the Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of ulcers, heartburn and liver issues.

Medical cannabis provides a two-pronged approach to treating the symptoms of osteoarthritis using THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). The pain and inflammation are addressed through these two active ingredients. CBD inhibits the inflammatory (cyclo-oxygenase) pathways that lead to redness, swelling and stiffness while providing relief from muscle spasm. Concerns of impairment from cannabis use are not a factor as CBD doesn’t cause intoxication, unlike THC. The effects are felt in the body and are non-euphoric.

THC still has an important place in the treatment of osteoarthritis. As the disease progresses and the joint space narrows, nerve involvement is a frequent complication. THC has receptors in areas of the brain, including the thalamus, which manage the perception of pain (particularly nerve pain). Pain that doesn’t stay localized to the joint and shoots down the legs, arms, or back is best controlled with THC.

THC’s intoxicating effects could be intimidating, but THC is also sedating and used for the induction and maintenance of sleep. Osteoarthritis and sleep disturbance are strongly associated. Lying supine (face and torso up) or prone (face down), or even simple movement can be excruciating and lead to frequent wakes and difficulty falling asleep. THC can assist in reducing wakes and reducing sleep latency. If the intoxication can be tolerated THC has incredible benefits.

The best option is a combination of the two active ingredients. Dried cannabis flower and oils are available in balanced (1-to-1 ratios) of THC and CBD providing all of the aforementioned benefits. Furthermore, the use of CBD with THC lowers the negative side effects of THC such as the euphoria and paranoia. Those requiring help with appropriate dosing for their ailments should seek the guidance of a physician or specialist, but CBD and THC can be used as needed for patients without complications or risk of drug interactions. Medical cannabis gives patients a valuable option. Medical and recreational avenues have pushed these possibilities to the forefront. Most people with osteoarthritis are not aware that cannabis can help. Our clinic staff and online information are available for medical cannabis users seeking a safe and legal way replace persistent pain with relief.


DR. IFEOLUWA ABIOLA, B.SC, MD.
MEDICAL DIRECTOR – 420 CLINIC LTD.

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Is CBD the Answer for Pain Relief?

In this new way of life that we are all experiencing right now, and people are starting to get back to this ‘new’ normal, uptight, and anger might be more prevalent in your personal space. Is this happening to you?

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CBD is an emerging name when it comes to health and wellness. For the uninitiated, CBD is a powerful analgesic compound derived from the cannabis plant that medical experts recommend for the treatment of various conditions. Due to its immense analgesic properties, cannabidiol is mostly effective against diseases that are symptomized by pain.

However, CBD can also be helpful for inflammatory conditions, anxiety disorders, mental diseases, sleep disorders, age-related conditions, etc. It’s generally contrasted against tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a euphoria-inducing compound of the cannabis plant. *

How Does CBD Work for Pain Relief?

Over the past few years, the demand for cannabis products has been on a steady rise. This has led to many cultivators investing in lab-tested cannabis seeds that really work as a way of producing more cannabis to offset the ever-soaring demand. Maybe you’re thinking along the same lines too. Or perhaps you’re a potential consumer wondering how you’ll benefit from the pain-relieving properties of one or more of the cannabis plant products like CBD.

To understand how cannabidiol treats pain, you’ll need to familiarize yourself with the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system refers to a cell-signaling system responsible for stabilizing the body’s normal homeostatic balance. The system plays a crucial role in relieving various medical conditions, including pain, anxiety, inflammation, insomnia, etc.

Your endocannabinoid system is made up of endogenous cannabinoids, known as endocannabinoids, as well as signal receptors known as endocannabinoid receptors. The main receptors in the endocannabinoid system include CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB1 receptors are widespread in the brain and central nervous system, whereas CB2 receptors are found in the peripheral cells, tissues, and organs.

Now, when you suffer an injury or medical condition that causes pain, the pain signals are registered on your endocannabinoid system. A complex cell-signaling mechanism involving your endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid receptors relay those signals to your brain and the brain coordinates the body’s defenses against the cause of pain.

Sometimes, these cell-signaling processes may not be so effective, especially for people with a compromised immune system. Therefore, it takes longer for your body to treat pain.

When you consume CBD, the phytocannabinoids travel to your endocannabinoid system and alter the chemical structure of your endocannabinoid receptors, mostly the CB2 receptors. Once their chemical formulae have been altered, your endogenous cannabinoids can now bind more effectively to these receptors, resulting in a faster relief from pain. CBD also contains neuroprotective properties that inhibit glutamate neurotoxicity, thereby promoting nerve functions.  I have no knowledge this is physiologically TRUE…

What Types of Pain Can CBD Treat?

Cannabidiol works on both nociceptive and neuropathic pains. Nociceptive pain, which is the most common type of pain, results from the stimulation of pain receptors (nociceptors) that are located in tissues and organs around the body. Most nociceptive pains are acute and result from a sudden injury to a body tissue. Some of the causes of nociceptive pain include accidents leading to bone fractures, surgical operation, cuts and burns, dental work, childbirth, etc.

On the other hand, neuropathic pain refers to pain that results from a continued exertion of pressure on the nerves. Neuropathic pains are generally signs of underlying medical conditions and common causes include:

  • Arthritis
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Migraines
  • Nerve damage pain

What Does Research Say?

Cannabidiol has shown immense positive results as far as pain treatment goes and there’s plenty of research to back that up. In this study from The European Journal of Pain, CBD was shown to help treat pain in arthritic rats. After applying CBD topically on the rats for four days, researchers observed a significant reduction in pain and inflammation. While the studies were conducted on rats, it’s easy to extend the results to humans, seeing as all animals have a near-similar endocannabinoid system.

In addition to arthritis, the effects of CBD on multiple sclerosis are also well-documented. One report from the NIH investigated such effects discovered that short-term application of CBD could help to reduce spasticity in MS patients. Spasticity is the main symptom of multiple sclerosis and managing it using CBD goes a long way in helping to treat the condition.

In recent years, we’ve witnessed a growing number of medical researchers and lobby groups advocating for the use of cannabis products for cancer management. CBD is a powerful anti-inflammatory compound that alleviates inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory messenger activity. According to the National Cancer Institute, those anti-inflammatory properties are useful in fighting cancer. Cannabidiol also shows positive results in treating various symptoms of chemotherapy including the nausea, vomiting, pain, and lack of appetite, although its partner, THC, demonstrates remarkable effects in the treatment of these same symptoms.

People suffering from migraines can also benefit immensely from cannabidiol’s pain-relieving benefits, according to a 2017 report, again by the NIH.  In this study, CBD was used alongside THC to relieve acute pain associated with migraines.

What is the Best Way to Take CBD for Pain Relief?

One of the best things about cannabidiol is that there are numerous ways to consume it. You can vaporize CBD oil, ingest via inhalation (i.e. smoking), consume CBD tinctures sublingually, apply CBD-infused ointments topically, swallow capsules, or eat CBD edibles.

Generally, the method you choose depends on the medical condition you’re treating. For instance, if you’re treating pain and inflammation resulting from a physical injury, you might consider using CBD-infused salves. If the pain is due to a severe neuropathic condition, along with CBD oil tinctures.

Perhaps the more pertinent question isn’t the method of administration but the right dose. CBD has no ideal dose. Instead, the amount of cannabidiol that you consume typically depends on how severe the pain is, as well as the strength of CBD in the product. For instance, while 50 mg of CBD might work for a mild backache, you may need higher doses to relieve acute pain induced by a surgical operation or a neurodegenerative disease.

Other factors that determine the amount of CBD to take for pain relief include the delivery method, your metabolic rate, and individual sensitivity or tolerance to CBD.

Evidently, CBD potentially does work for pain relief. However, before integrating cannabidiol into your life…our recommendation is to always consult with a medical professional, and purchase from a reputed source.

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The Ultimate Guide to CBD and Seniors With Arthritis

In the United States, 23 percent of adults suffer from arthritis. Around the world, 350 million people have this condition. While most people who have arthritis are age 65 or older, there are still many young and middle-aged adults who also have this c…

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In the United States, 23 percent of adults suffer from arthritis. Around the world, 350 million people have this condition. While most people who have arthritis are age 65 or older, there are still many young and middle-aged adults who also have this condition. Unfortunately, there is no known cure for arthritis. The best thing […]

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arthritis

Patterns of medicinal cannabis use, strain analysis, and substitution effect among patients with migraine, headache, arthritis, and chronic pain in a medicinal cannabis cohort

Medicinal cannabis registries typically report pain as the most common reason for use. It would be clinically useful to identify patterns of cannabis treatment in migraine and headache, as compared to arthritis and chronic pain, and to analyze preferred cannabis strains, biochemical profiles, and prescription medication substitutions with cannabis.
Via electronic survey in medicinal cannabis patients with headache, arthritis, and chronic pain, demographics and patterns of cannabis use including methods, frequency, quantity, preferred strains, cannabinoid and terpene profiles, and prescription substitutions were recorded.

The post Patterns of medicinal cannabis use, strain analysis, and substitution effect among patients with migraine, headache, arthritis, and chronic pain in a medicinal cannabis cohort appeared first on Weed World Magazine.

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Patterns of medicinal cannabis use, strain analysis, and substitution effect among patients with migraine, headache, arthritis, and chronic pain in a medicinal cannabis cohort

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Medicinal cannabis registries typically report pain as the most common reason for use. It would be clinically useful to identify patterns of cannabis treatment in migraine and headache, as compared to arthritis and chronic pain, and to analyze preferred cannabis strains, biochemical profiles, and prescription medication substitutions with cannabis.

METHODS:

Via electronic survey in medicinal cannabis patients with headache, arthritis, and chronic pain, demographics and patterns of cannabis use including methods, frequency, quantity, preferred strains, cannabinoid and terpene profiles, and prescription substitutions were recorded. Cannabis use for migraine among headache patients was assessed via the ID Migraine™ questionnaire, a validated screen used to predict the probability of migraine.

RESULTS:

Of 2032 patients, 21 illnesses were treated with cannabisPain syndromes accounted for 42.4% (n = 861) overall; chronic pain 29.4% (n = 598;), arthritis 9.3% (n = 188), and headache 3.7% (n = 75;). Across all 21 illnesses, headache was a symptom treated with cannabis in 24.9% (n = 505). These patients were given the ID Migraine™ questionnaire, with 68% (n = 343) giving 3 “Yes” responses, 20% (n = 102) giving 2 “Yes” responses (97% and 93% probability of migraine, respectively). Therefore, 88% (n = 445) of headache patients were treating probable migraine with cannabis. Hybrid strains were most preferred across all pain subtypes, with “OG Shark” the most preferred strain in the ID Migraine™ and headache groups. Many pain patients substituted prescription medications with cannabis (41.2-59.5%), most commonly opiates/opioids (40.5-72.8%). Prescription substitution in headache patients included opiates/opioids (43.4%), anti-depressant/anti-anxiety (39%), NSAIDs (21%), triptans (8.1%), anti-convulsants (7.7%), muscle relaxers (7%), ergots (0.4%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Chronic pain was the most common reason for cannabis use, consistent with most registries. The majority of headache patients treating with cannabis were positive for migraine. Hybrid strains were preferred in ID Migraine™, headache, and most pain groups, with “OG Shark”, a high THC (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol)/THCA (tetrahydrocannabinolic acid), low CBD (cannabidiol)/CBDA (cannabidiolic acid), strain with predominant terpenes β-caryophyllene and β-myrcene, most preferred in the headache and ID Migraine™ groups. This could reflect the potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-emetic properties of THC, with anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of β-caryophyllene and β-myrcene. Opiates/opioids were most commonly substituted with cannabis. Prospective studies are needed, but results may provide early insight into optimizing crossbred cannabis strains, synergistic biochemical profiles, dosing, and patterns of use in the treatment of headache, migraine, and chronic pain syndromes.

Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Source:Pubmed

 

PMID: 29797104 PMCID: PMC5968020 DOI: 10.1186/s10194-018-0862-2

 

Baron EP1Lucas P2,3,4Eades J2Hogue O5.

The post Patterns of medicinal cannabis use, strain analysis, and substitution effect among patients with migraine, headache, arthritis, and chronic pain in a medicinal cannabis cohort appeared first on Weed World Magazine.

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