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Seattle Dispensary Launches Cannabis Packaging Recycle Program To Fight Waste

Customers can bring in any kind of marijuana waste materials, even from other stores.

The post Seattle Dispensary Launches Cannabis Packaging Recycle Program To Fight Waste appeared first on High Times.

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In the hope that consumers will stop throwing out bulky but potentially recyclable cannabis product packaging, one West Seattle marijuana store has announced an incentive program to get customers to give them their trash.

Canna West Seattle owner Maryam Minateghi has instituted a program for clients who wish to bring in their marijuana packaging trash. It’s a deal — especially since she doesn’t even care if the trash came from her stores.

“We don’t think this is something only we should do, but we are really hoping to start the conversation,” Minateghi told a local publication. “We are really hoping to create a better connection between the cannabis industry and the environment in general.”

Washington state’s problem with cannabis packaging pollution was documented by the Washington Post in August, when the paper published an article that addressed the doob tubes and Mylar bags that have been found bobbing in the Puget Sound.

“The historical cannabis community is environmentalist, but green rushers aren’t, necessarily,” the president of the Cannabis Alliance, Danielle Rosellion, told the publication at the time.

Many think that cannabis regulators have gone overboard with packaging regulations in the interest of protecting kids who may be otherwise exposed to the products.

In April, parent and cannabis user Danielle Simone Brand wrote an op-ed for High Times that focused on defusing the myth that safe kids means environmentally unsafe cannabis packaging. In it, she advocated for parents taking responsibility for teaching kids about which substances they should stay away from — and not relying on governmental guidelines to do the work for them.

“Treat them like capable and intelligent people,” wrote Simone Brand. “No packaging solution can ever take the place of that.”

She’s not the only one who does not see the excess of plastic as our best option for marijuana goods. In Canada, critics have been vocal about their dissatisfaction over such unnecessary waste. In the face of such concerns, the British Columbia government recently announced a policy shift that will make it possible for cannabis stores to sell their wares in reusable packaging.

In California, CannaCraft has taken seriously the challenge to become more environmentally friendly. The company now seals its vape cartridges before sale, a change that company representatives say saves a stack of child-resistant tubes that would stand 30 times taller than Mount Everest.

Such individual actions do add up. But until regulations shift to take our stability-challenged ecosystems into account, in West Seattle consumers now have an option to take the guesswork out of which cannabis packaging can be recycled.

At Canna Culture shop, news cameras captured a man who had brought in CBD drink bottles, half of which he said he had purchased in another dispensary. Mirnateghi says that he’s far from the only cannabis consumer who is taking advantage of the collection drop-off.

“The response to the program has been fantastic,” said Mirnateghi. “We have only been doing this for a few days now and already we’ve captured a lot of recyclable materials and a lot of attention. I think we’ve collected enough recyclables to fill a small closet.”

The post Seattle Dispensary Launches Cannabis Packaging Recycle Program To Fight Waste appeared first on High Times.

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Article

Sustainability In The Cannabis Industry: Truly Going Green

Thanks to a decades-long association with “hippies” and “tree-huggers,” cannabis has largely been considered a green (no pun intended) industry by the masses. Many may not realize that cannabis has never really been a sustainable industry, and with the…

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Thanks to a decades-long association with “hippies” and “tree-huggers,” cannabis has largely been considered a green (no pun intended) industry by the masses. Many may not realize that cannabis has never really been a sustainable industry, and with the commercialization of cannabis, things have continued to move in the wrong direction. As the co-founder of an investment and operating firm in the cannabis space, I am concerned about the sustainability of this industry. Commercial growers…

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Alberta

Push On For Alberta Bottle Depots To Accept Cannabis Containers For Refunds

The group that oversees bottle depots in Alberta says people should be allowed to drop off cannabis containers and get a small refund just as they do for bottles and cans. The Alberta Bottle Depot Association says paying a deposit on the containers and…

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The group that oversees bottle depots in Alberta says people should be allowed to drop off cannabis containers and get a small refund just as they do for bottles and cans. The Alberta Bottle Depot Association says paying a deposit on the containers and having it returned at dropoff would help divert plastic from landfills and stabilize declines in depot income. Association spokesman Jerry Roczkowsky says depots are ready to accept cannabis containers and it’s…

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environment

Louisiana industrial hemp hit hard by southern blight

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Louisiana’s first industrial hemp crop is getting hammered by a fungal disease called southern blight.

LSU AgCenter plant doctor Raj Singh says the disease is caused by a soilborne fungus called Sclerotium rolfsii.

“The pathogen has a wide host range and is known to cause disease on more than 500 plant species in 100 plant families,” Singh said. “Some of the economically important vegetables include tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplants and cucurbits.”

The fungus also affects a wide variety of woody ornamentals, annual and perennial herbaceous, and bedding plants.

Hemp plants infected with southern blight start to wilt initially and later on turn brown and eventually die, Singh said.

On closer inspection of wilted plants, dead, water-soaked lesions can be observed along with white fungal growth (mycelium) and sclerotia on the base of the plant at the soil line.

“Sclerotia are fungal structures that help the pathogen survive adverse environmental conditions,” he said. “They are tiny, mustard seed-like, tan-colored when young and turn reddish to dark brown as they age.”

They can persist in infested soils for several years in the absence of a host.

The pathogen survives as mycelium or sclerotia on plant debris or in the form of sclerotia on topsoil around infected plants. These sclerotia are formed from mycelium extending from the base of infected plants.

Southern blight is favored by hot and humid weather, which is common in Louisiana. The pathogen has the ability to infect industrial hemp plants at any stage of their growth development.
The pathogen may spread by a number of means, including planting of diseased transplants, movement of infested soil, equipment, tools and plant debris. Running irrigation water may also aid in dispersal of sclerotia.

“Management of southern blight warrants an integrated disease management approach,” Singh said. “Growers must plant disease-free, healthy transplants and avoid physical injury to roots and lower stems while handling and transplanting the seedlings.”

Fields with a history of southern blight must be avoided. And growers should scout hemp fields regularly for symptom development.

Farmers should destroy symptomatic plants immediately and not leave removed infected plants in the row middles or carry them across the field. They should dig out infected plant with a shovel and remove the entire plant with the root ball and soil around it, place it in a trash bag to contain the infested soil and sclerotia, then remove it from the field.

Movement of infested soils should be minimized to prevent pathogen spread, Singh said. He recommends cleaning farm equipment to remove soil and encourages personnel working in fields infested with southern blight to clean their boots.

Growers should work with disease-free fields first followed by fields infested with southern blight.

“Keep weeds in check, as some species may serve as alternate hosts of the pathogen,” Singh said. “Destroy crop debris as soon as possible after harvesting.”

He recommends deep plowing to bury sclerotia to reduce pathogen inoculum.

Currently, no fungicides are available for industrial hemp growers to manage southern blight.

Read the entire article here.

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